Donnerstag, 30. Juni 2016

Update on rose cuttings

Dear readers,
as you might remember from a previous post, about three weeks ago I took some cuttings from roses in the hope that they would root and establish into rose plants one day. When I was looking at my cuttings this week I was very happy to find roots on three of my cuttings. Unfortunately I lost many of my other cuttings due to rotting, maybe the substrate was too wet, but as long as some cuttings make it I am more than happy. There are still about 20 cuttings, which haven´t yet rooted, but which still look healthy and I am hoping that at least some of them will still develop roots.
Since I took the cuttings from rosebushes at the Hermesvilla, also see post Hermesvilla and its beautiful roses, I don´t know the names of the roses, but maybe I can identify them once they bloom for me. Here are some pictures of the cuttings that have rooted.











As I was very happy with my small success in rooting rose cuttings, I took some new cuttings last Friday, using a different, better drained substrate. We´ll see how it goes! Please let me know in the comments whether you have ever tried to root rose cuttings and what your experiences were.
     

                                                         Wishing you all a lovely day!
                                                                              Lisa
                               

                                                                          

Kommentare:

  1. Hi Lisa, congratulations on your rose cuttings that have rooted! From what I have heard it is pretty normal that not all cuttings take and that there is always a certain percentage that just dies. I am curious to know if you did use a rooting hormone.
    Even though I grow roses for over 20 years now, I have never tried to root a cutting. Somehow it just didn't appeal to me to try it. But I can certainly see that it is exciting to do and a very helpful skill, considering that so many rose varieties are threatened by extinction and with the massive closing of rose nurseries here in the US there are many rose varieties that you can't just simply buy anymore.
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. Dear Christina,
      thank you! Yes, I heard the same and expected that some would die. However, I saw that some cuttings that died due to rotting had produced some callus tissue or even some very tiny roots, so I think it might also have to do with too much moisture. I only try rooting such roses which I don´t yet possess and which are difficult to get in Austria. As you said, there are some rose varieties that aren´t available at nursery´s anymore and are threatened to extinguish one day. The roses at the Hermesvilla, for example, are extremely beautiful and very unlike any roses I could buy at a rose nursery, thus I had to take the opportunity and try to propagate them. I think it´d be such a shame if such beautiful roses were to cease. I don´t know about the situation in the US, but here in Austria you hardly see old roses anymore in private gardens. People seem to prefer new varieties, which repeat blooming and are disease resistant. I too prefer it when a rose repeats flowering. Nevertheless, I think it is absolutely worth growing old roses, to me they look very different to modern roses( especially some varieties such as moss roses) and they bloom in such abundance that can hardly be compared with any modern rose.
      Have a lovely day!
      Lisa

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  2. Rose cuttings? I have to make some myself! Looks easy. I will try it next week. Groetjes Hetty

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    1. Hetty, it is definitely worth a try! I read that not all varieties do well on their own roots, but especially old roses are said to grow well that way. I am curious how it will work for you, please tell me as soon as you see the first results! Good luck! Lisa

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